Research Psychologists and Post-Doctoral Fellows


Aileen Echiverri-Cohen, Ph.D.

Dr. Echiverri-Cohen is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the UCLA Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Washington where she specialized in research and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr. Echiverri-Cohen completed an APA accredited, pre-doctoral internship at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Her current research interest is in transdiagnostic markers, specifically, deficits in response inhibition, that contribute to the maintenance of psychopathology.

Kean Hsu, Ph.D.

Dr. Hsu is a post-doctoral researcher at the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Dr. Hsu received his doctorate from the University of Southern California and completed an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship at Pacific Clinics in Los Angeles. He also completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at McLean Hospital, while serving as a clinical fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. His research investigates how attention and cognitive control processes impact the etiology and exacerbate symptom severity of anxiety and depression. He is also interested in examining mechanisms underlying psychotherapeutic interventions, as well as increasing awareness of issues surrounding mental health and stigma in communities that are typically under-served or under-utilize mental health services.

Richard LeBeau, Ph.D.

Dr. LeBeau is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Dr. LeBeau received his doctorate from UCLA and completed an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship at the Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System. He also completed an APA-accredited post-doctoral fellowship at the Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System that focused on implementing evidence-based integrative treatment modalities (e.g., mindfulness-based stress reduction, biofeedback) and enhancing interprofessional collaboration in the medical setting. His research interests include understanding the role of social rejection in the onset and maintenance of anxiety and mood disorders, particularly within marginalized populations, and improving the dissemination of cutting-edge cognitive behavioral therapies into healthcare systems and community settings.

Ben Tabak, Ph.D.

Dr. Tabak is a post-doctoral scholar in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). His research examines biopsychosocial factors that contribute to social anxiety and depression. Dr. Tabak received his doctorate from the University of Miami, and completed an APA predoctoral internship at the Miami VA Medical Center.

Michael Treanor, Ph.D.

Dr. Treanor is an NIMH post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). His research examines methods for enhancing exposure therapy through selective targeting of associative learning mechanisms. In addition, he examines risk factors for the development of anxiety and threat-based psychopathology. Dr. Treanor received his doctorate from the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and completed an APA predoctoral internship at the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Behavioral Science Division. Dr. Treanor also maintains a private practice in Beverly Hills focusing on the treatment of anxiety and trauma.

Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, Ph.D.

Dr. Kate Wolitzky-Taylor is an Associate Faculty of the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Dr. Wolitzky-Taylor obtained her B.A. summa cum laude in psychology from Emory University, where she completed her undergraduate research assistantship in the Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, obtaining clinical and research training in the Laboratory for the Study of Anxiety Disorders. Dr. Wolitzky-Taylor received a predoctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA, F31) from by NIMH in order to examine self-administered behavioral treatments for pathological worry. Dr. Wolitzky-Taylor completed her predoctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina in the Traumatic Stress Track, where she was on an NIMH-funded trauma-related training grant (T32). She completed a 3-year postdoctoral research fellowship at UCLA in the ADRC (2009-2012) where she was the Project Director of the Youth Emotion Project, an NIMH-funded R01 examining common and specific risk factors for anxiety and depression. Dr. Wolitzky-Taylor is currently the Principal Investigator on a Career Development Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K23; funded by NIDA), the focus of which is to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a brief CBT program to be delivered in community substance use disorder (SUD) specialty care clinics for individuals with comorbid anxiety disorders and SUDs. Her primary faculty appointment is as an Assistant Professor in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, where she conducts research in the Integrated Substance Abuse Program. She also treats patients with anxiety and related disorders using CBT in the Faculty Practice Outpatient Clinic and in the Sports Psychiatry Service. She has extensive experience in training and supervising clinical psychology doctoral students and psychiatry residents in delivering CBT and in research methods. Since her postdoctoral fellowship at the ADRC, Dr. Wolitzky-Taylor has provided clinical supervision, statistical consultation, and research mentorship to the ADRC's doctoral students and research staff. Her research interests include investigating mechanisms of change during behavioral treatment for anxiety disorders, increasing access to CBT for anxiety disorders in community settings, and understanding and treating comorbid anxiety and SUDs.

Katie Young, Ph.D.

Dr. Young is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Her research investigates commonalities and distinctions in neural mediators of anxiety and depression. She is particularly interested in examining differential processing of social cues (emotional facial expressions and vocalisations) across mood disorders. Dr. Young received her doctorate from the University of Oxford where her work focused on behavioural and neural responses to infant vocalisations in adults with and without depression.