Post-Doctoral Fellows

Aileen Echiverri-Cohen, Ph.D.

echiverri@psych.ucla.edu

Dr. Echiverri-Cohen is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the UCLA Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Washington where she specialized in research and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr. Echiverri-Cohen completed an APA accredited, pre-doctoral internship at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Her current research interest is in transdiagnostic markers, specifically, deficits in response inhibition, that contribute to the maintenance of psychopathology.

Jeffrey D. Knotts, Ph.D.

jknotts@g.ucla.edu

Dr. Knotts is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). His research investigates the neural mechanisms associated with mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD. He is particularly interested in using fMRI to study how the activity of threat and reward systems may be predictive of anxiety and depression symptoms in young adults. Dr. Knotts received his doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles, where his work focused on optimizing psychophysical measures of unconscious visual perception and using fMRI to study the neural correlates of visual consciousness.

Richard LeBeau, Ph.D.

rlebeau@ucla.edu

Dr. LeBeau is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Dr. LeBeau received his doctorate from UCLA and completed an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship at the Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System. He also completed an APA-accredited post-doctoral fellowship at the Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System that focused on implementing evidence-based integrative treatment modalities (e.g., mindfulness-based stress reduction, biofeedback) and enhancing interprofessional collaboration in the medical setting. His research interests include understanding the role of social rejection in the onset and maintenance of anxiety and mood disorders, particularly within marginalized populations, and improving the dissemination of cutting-edge cognitive behavioral therapies into healthcare systems and community settings.

Yujia Peng, Ph.D.

yjpeng@ucla.edu

Dr. Peng is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Her research investigates the neural mechanisms associated to mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD. She is particularly interested in (1) the relationship between threat- and reward-related neural circuitries and symptom dimensions of anxiety and depression during the critical developmental transition from adolescence to adulthood, and (2) developing PTSD treatments through computational neuroimaging methods. Dr. Peng received her doctorate from University of California, Los Angeles, where her work focused on revealing mechanisms behind motion perception and action understanding using approaches including behavioral experiments, computational modeling and neuroimaging. Please see yujiapeng.com for more information.

Michael Treanor, Ph.D.

mtreanor@psych.ucla.edu

Dr. Treanor is an Assistant Project Scientist at the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). His research examines methods for enhancing exposure therapy through selective targeting of associative learning mechanisms. In addition, he examines risk factors for the development of anxiety and threat-based psychopathology. Dr. Treanor received his doctorate from the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and completed an APA predoctoral internship at the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Behavioral Science Division. Dr. Treanor also maintains a private practice in Beverly Hills focusing on the treatment of anxiety and trauma.

Katherine Young, DPhil

kyoung@psych.ucla.edu

Dr. Young is a post-doctoral fellow in the Anxiety and Depression Research Center (ADRC). Her research investigates commonalities and distinctions in neural mediators of anxiety and depression. She is particularly interested in examining differential processing of social cues (emotional facial expressions and vocalisations) across mood disorders. Dr. Young received her doctorate from the University of Oxford where her work focused on behavioural and neural responses to infant vocalisations in adults with and without depression.